How to Serve in Tennis

Serving , is probably the most difficult part in tennis, because of the rythym, and the motion. Just like anything out there, like going to the gym persistantly, you have to put time and effort into it to see any results. When I was training for tournaments I would practice at least 6-7 days out of the week for one and a half hours to two hours, and in 2 years my serve clock in at about 114mph and I was only 17 (thanks to my coach Alex). Now that im 20, and a little more stronger, and I would guess I could reach about 120mph now. Along with a big serve you need variety, so in this blog i'll talk about the serve.

In Tennis you get 2 chances to serve the ball. If you serve and the opponent doesn't touch the ball its considered to be an ace, and you win the point. If you miss with both chances then its called a "Double Fault", and you lose the point.

When serving you want to stand about a foot away from the middle, behind the baseline about an inch so you dont foot fault (which mean's you lose the point if you touch the baseline while serving), and your body a bit sideways with your left foot pointed at about 45 degrees from the baseline. So your feet should look like this for both of your serves.

Next if you notice where the yellow dot is, this is where you should bounce the ball. When you toss the ball it should want to land here because keeping your ball toss infront of you and in the same spot everytime makes it easier to hit

Rules of Tennis

Simple get the ball in the court

To be a little more specific if your playing Singles (1 vs 1), then you use these lines

If your playing Doubles (2 vs 2), then you use these lines

Anywhere on the otherside of the net, after the serve is fair game.

The ball can only hit your racket once, and bounce once, SO MOVE YOUR FEET!!!

The Community of Pickup Sports & Games

Much has happened since I spoke last with Jonny Chai of 5 Stones Fitness while he was pulling his kid around in a tire on the Marina Green in San Francisco.  But I had the chance to speak with Jonny again today to learn more about his personal training business in San Francisco, as well as what he's looking to do as he expands his business.  Jonny's an interesting guy, and is definitely focused on the importance of community in his client base - and his business as a whole.

And then I opened my personal Facebook account and got an update from one of my old Irvine Novaquatics swimming teammates, Morgan Hoesterey.  Aside from my insane jealousy for her stand-up paddleboarding lifestyle, I felt very happy and proud of her for pursuing her dreams in Hawaii - and having a damn good time with her friends while doing it.  You can learn more about her travels and adventures on their Destination 3 degrees Facebook site.  (Go girl!)

This brings me back to community, friendships and the innate human need to be around other people.  You've read about me questioning whether or not surfing, rock climbing or other "individual" sports are best alone (found here) - whether it be tennis, soccer, basketball, etc.  Now I'm posing another question: It's possible to do "individual" sports alone, but is it possible to get maximal enjoyment out of those sports while playing alone?

My previous argument that individual sports are better enjoyed with someone else could be bolstered by the fact that competition in and of itself creates a community, which in turn makes sports more enjoyable.  We're competitive creatures by nature, and a little competition is always healthy...

Are you confused yet?  If not, I'm glad we understand each other.  If so, I encourage you to get out and find a game to see what we mean by "community".

High expectation's for the future of "pickup sports"

...that is, when more american's learn how important exercise is.

I am tennis/guitar player and also a college student and  am very dedicated to what I do. I've always believed if I wanted to do something, then do it right, and the only way you can get there is dedication, disipline, and the desire. Growing up I was chubby, and maybe even obese, and I thought I could just sit home watch cartoons and play video games. Untill my parents put me through different sports. I actually started off swiming, yes I was that chubby 10 year old in a speedo, but when I was put into a pool for the first time it was an amazing expierence. Which eventually led to me going back often, that led to me joining a swim team, and winning a bunch of swim meets.

When my swiming days ended I got into alot of other stuff like basketball, ice skating, football, jeet kune do, and judo. But nothing really stuck like guitar and tennis did. I still to this day have my first guitar even though I've moved on through 3 other ones, because of it memories of where i started on it.

Tennis is what really saved my physical apperance, beacause if I didnt pickup that, I might've gone back to eating chetos and playing halo for the rest of my life. But thankfully I met really good russian coaches that once played in the pro curcuit, who drilled me to death with forehands, backhands, and serves. If it wasnt for tennis then I'd probably weigh alot more than 180. Pickup sports I believe is a great tool to find people that enjoy the same actiivties that you do, if its from basketball to any other sport that floats your boat. I've also heard that evently "Pickup Sports" will soon be more musician freindly too. With all the bands out there missing a singer, drummer, bassisst, or guitarist, it would definately be awesome if musicians can connect better too.